Patrick Mahaffy, president and chief executive of Clovis Oncology Inc., a cancer-drug firm based in Boulder, joined U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., at a meeting of the Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee on job creation in late July.

Bennet invited Mahaffy as part of his efforts to bring Colorado leaders to Washington to share their ideas to the challenges facing the nation.

Mahaffy participated in a panel with business leaders from across the United States. The discussion focused on how their innovative businesses have created jobs in their respective states and how their successes can be duplicated.

In his prepared remarks, Mahaffy called upon Congress to continue moving forward with reforms at the Food and Drug Administration, preserve funding at the National Institutes of Health, pass meaningful reforms to the nation’s tax code and develop a sound fiscal policy to promote investment in innovative businesses.

Clovis Oncology is a biopharmaceutical company focused on developing innovative anti-cancer drugs for specific subsets of cancer populations. Clovis raised two rounds of capital through initial public offerings in less than a year.


Co-founders and executives of Niwot-based Crocs Inc. (Nasdaq: CROX) rang Nasdaq’s opening bell on Tuesday, July 31, commemorating the shoemaker’s 10th anniversary.

Crocs, founded in 2002 by George Boedecker, Scott Seamans and Duke Hanson, has sold more than 250 million pairs of shoes since its inception, including nearly 50 million pairs in 2011.

“A decade ago, three friends introduced Crocs to the world. Since then, with comfort as our cornerstone, we’ve grown from a one-shoe company to a global footwear brand with more than 300 shoe styles for all seasons,” said John McCarvel, president and CEO of Crocs.

To add icing to Crocs’ success, Georgetown Cupcakes made 2,000 cupcakes in the shape of Crocs’ iconic clog for the special day. About 1,000 cupcakes were given to tourists and locals strolling through Times Square.


And the envelope please.

President Barack Obama’s visit to the University of Colorado-Boulder campus April 24 cost the university about $110,000.

“The visit of a sitting president is a historic opportunity for any campus,” said CU-Boulder chancellor Philip P. DiStefano. “CU-Boulder was honored to have been asked to host President Obama’s visit. His visit drew international media coverage and showcased our campus community in a marvelous way to a global audience.”

The Eye was told that the funding for the visit will come from existing insurance rebates to the university, and will not result in any tuition or fee increase to students or reductions in campus budgets.


Available for free: three historic bungalows, worn but in good condition and historically interesting. New owners must take “as is” and relocate. Current owner will pay $25,000 for each house to defray moving costs.

The University of Colorado-Boulder is trying to find new takers for three buildings in the Grandview Terrace neighborhood. The 1920s-era bungalows were used by CU’s Institute of Behavioral Science, but now face the wrecking ball unless new owners willing and able to relocate the structures come forward.

CU is giving the buildings at 1220, 1243 and 1244 Grandview Ave. away, provided new owners can afford to relocate the buildings and will work with a company qualified to move old structures, spokesman Bronson Hilliard said.

“They can take them off our hands at no cost,” Hilliard said. “These are very nice bungalows, in terms of what they represent historically.”

CU doesn’t want to pay the $2.2 million needed to refurbish the buildings and is generating ideas for what could be built in their place, Hilliard said.

“We don’t have any defined projects that would go in their spaces,” he said, adding that in the near term the land could be used for parking.

A request for proposals is available online at colorado.edu/facilitiesmanagement/pdc/construction/open.html. To be considered, the bid must come from a qualified general contractor. New owners will be selected by lottery, according to the RFP.

Bids must be received by Oct. 17, and the estimated contract award date is Oct. 29, according to the RFP.